war

The Operation In Syria Splits Europe

By Arthur Dunn

At the Munich Security Conference 2011 NATO Secretary General Rasmussen introduced a new concept of defense, capable of creating more favorable conditions in the field of security with fewer resources through closer cooperation and flexible than it was before. It is based on the principle of differentiated responsibilities of the Alliance members with different capabilities, taking into account, in what areas they have an advantage. And the search for common ground with other organizations. In the first place with the European Union, whose interests in the field of security is largely coincide with those of NATO. But as for an organization such as the Collective Security Treaty Organization, NATO is still only prefers to develop bilateral relations with each of the members of this organization. Strengthening of cooperation with the countries of the CSTO is dictated by the situation in neighboring Afghanistan. As well as the modernization of NATO itself.

The Nightmare Scenario: A U.S.-China War

By James R. Holmes

Our great and powerful editor has requested—nay, demanded!—a series of posts exploring how a U.S.-China war might unfold. That sounds like a request for prophecy. But making predictions is a dicey business, as the equally great and powerful sage Yogi Berra reportedly observed—especially when they’re about the future. The Naval Diplomat is no clairvoyant. Undeterred, we nonetheless commence a five-post cycle exploring some of the big ideas likely to shape each phase of a Far Eastern maelstrom.

War in Iran may turn Caspian Sea region into arena of military operations

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By Arzu Naghiyev

If the U.S. and Israel begin massive air attacks on Iran, Tehran can clearly respond to these actions. Border countries can be the target of some missiles, which it will use in the conflict. That is why, it is necessary to place modern radar systems in the countries bordering with Armenia and Iran, as well as along the coast of the Caspian Sea.

Twenty years ago: the birth of NATO’s crisis-management role

Twenty years ago, in July 1992, NATO started taking on a limited crisis-management role in support of international efforts to end the conflict in the former Yugoslavia. Within a few years, the Alliance was called upon to play a more robust role: it deployed its first ever peace-support operation to Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1995 and later intervened to end the crisis in Kosovo in 1999. NATO’s involvement in stabilising the Western Balkans has played a key role in the transformation of the Alliance after the end of the Cold War.

NATO nixes Syria action plan

NATO rejected Turkey’s request for the adoption of a contingency plan to include the establishment a no-fly zone over Syrian airspace, which was made during a meeting last week in Brussels after Turkey invoked Article Four of the NATO Treaty in response to Syria’s downing of a Turkish jet in international airspace.