Yanukovich

Solutions for Russian-Ukrainian Gas Brinksmanship

By RICHARD B. ANDRES, MICHAEL KOFMAN AND MICAH J. LOUDERMILK

Tensions between Ukraine and Russia are not new, but their resurgence bodes ill for European energy security. This latest dispute between Europe’s largest natural gas supplying state and its key gas transit state should be a warning flag to Europe that, despite efforts by the IMF and other countries, the underlying causes of the dispute that left Europe without gas for heating and electricity in 2009 remain unresolved and require European intervention. Below we describe the nature of the problem and propose an approach for addressing one of Europe’s most important energy security problems.

Any changes in Ukraine’s foreign policy?

By Arūnas Spraunius

In the interview to the Latvian daily ”Diena” former Ukrainian president  V.Yushchenko said that European policy often looks like the natural merit not requiring any evidence, and that integration of Ukraine into EU is perceived as one-sided, i.e. exceptionally the Ukrainian act. Europe assigns to the candidate tasks but cannot avoid dual policy on such issues as security, energy, visa policy and defense. European Union would benefit from the accelerated integration of the country with 46 million citizens; therefore the current slow down of Ukraine’s euro integration should be treated as a bad decision. According to V.Yushchenko, his country has always been within the system of European values.

Eastern Europe’s Tito Option

By Andrew Wilson

Success stories in what the European Union calls “the neighborhood” have been hard to come by. First Georgia, then Ukraine, and most recently Moldova have all been big EU hopes. But, in each case, those hopes were dashed. Unfortunately for the EU, this year’s annual summit with Ukraine (on November 22) will likely showcase this failure.

The Reset Blooms

By Nikolas K. Gvosdev

Over the past year, I was skeptical of the Obama administration’s vaunted “reset” of relations with Russia. In January of this year, I wrote, “The problem is simple: not only are many Russian and American interests today out of alignment, the political realities in both countries work against any effective partnership being developed.”

In A Multi-Vector Trap: Who Will Guarantee The Security Of Ukraine?

By Oleg Gorbunov

In the end of September Ukraine raised an important issue during the UNO General Assembly – who will guarantee the security of non-nuclear states? Which is the point to strive for neutrality if it will result into vulnerability? In this respect “Politcom.ru” asked the experts the following question: how do you assess the possibility of the signing of an international treaty that would guarantee the security of Ukraine and other states, which refused of its nuclear potential and/or which are not included into international military blocks?

A Strategic Opportunity for Ukraine

By Matthew Rojansky

There are neighborhoods in Kyiv one might easily mistake for Paris, London, or New York: intricately decorated Victorian apartment buildings and townhouses mingle with sidewalk cafes, small parks and monuments, mid-century office blocks, and glass-fronted modern office towers.  And stretching skyward from the crests of Kyiv’s famous seven hills are its unmistakably Slavic monuments—the onion domes and golden crosses of St. Michael’s and St. Sophia’s cathedrals, and the Caves Monastery.