Biden

Foreign Policy Setbacks Deepen Obama's Wounds

By Scott Wilson

Presidents have often turned to foreign policy after domestic setbacks - from Ronald Reagan's Latin American tour and speech calling the Soviet Union the "focus of evil in the modern world" in the months after his party's 1982 congressional losses to Bill Clinton's escape to Indonesia and the Philippines following his own midterm trouncing a dozen years later. Both found redemption at the polls.

The Reset Blooms

By Nikolas K. Gvosdev

Over the past year, I was skeptical of the Obama administration’s vaunted “reset” of relations with Russia. In January of this year, I wrote, “The problem is simple: not only are many Russian and American interests today out of alignment, the political realities in both countries work against any effective partnership being developed.”

Clinton Seeks to Reassure Russia’s Neighbors

By Ellen Barry

At the end of a trip intended to reassure Russia’s neighbors that the Obama administration would not forget them in its push to improve relations with Moscow, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton resorted to the simplest of diplomatic formulations, telling Georgia, the United States “can walk and chew gum at the same time.” Mrs. Clinton repeated the argument like a mantra during her five-day swing through Ukraine, Poland, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia: that the “reset” will not force the United States to sacrifice its influence or policies in the post-Soviet space.

The myth of Iran's 'isolation'

By Charles Krauthammer

In announcing the passage of a U.N. Security Council resolution imposing sanctions on Iran, President Obama stressed not once but twice Iran's increasing "isolation" from the world. This claim is not surprising considering that after 16 months of an "extended hand" policy, in response to which Iran accelerated its nuclear program -- more centrifuges, more enrichment sites, higher enrichment levels -- Iranian "isolation" is about the only achievement to which the administration can even plausibly lay claim.

Saakashvili meets Biden

By Salome Modebadze

President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili met US Vice President Joe Biden at the White House in Washington on April 14. According to information released by the Press Service of the White House and the US Embassy in Tbilisi the two sides discussed the deep friendly relations between the two nations, which are based on the principles of democracy, freedom and human rights.