terrorism

Terrorism and the Taliban

By Munir Akram

The cold-blooded shooting of Malala Yousufzai, the girls’ rights activist, by a Taliban hit man has led to an unusual outcry in Pakistan against this “bestial”, “obscene” and “horrendous” act of terrorism. This commendable popular revulsion, emanating from religious and political parties, as well as the military leadership, can crystallise effective action against the perpetrators of terrorist violence in Pakistan.

Countering Terrorism

The fight against terrorism is high on NATO’s agenda. Both the Strategic Concept¹ and the Lisbon Summit Declaration² make clear that terrorism poses a real and serious threat to the security and safety of the Alliance and its members. NATO will continue to fight this scourge, individually and collectively, in accordance with international law and the principles of the UN Charter. NATO’s new Policy Guidelines for Alliance work on counter-terrorism focus on improved threat awareness, adequate capabilities and enhanced engagement with partner countries and other international actors.

Revisiting Nato's Role

By Harun ur Rashid

It is very important to remember that its 1949 founding documents clearly say that Nato is a defensive organisation, which would go into action only when one of its member states was attacked. This is known as collective defence. Nato (Atlantic Pact) was constituted to counter communism and the Soviet threat during the Cold War.

Nursultan Nazarbayev Suggested the World Community to Design and Adopt a Comprehensive Declaration of Nuclear-Free World

The address of President of the Republic of Kazakhstan N.A.Nazarbayev during a morning session of the Nuclear Security Summit on the subject “National Measures to Reduce the Threat of Nuclear Terrorism and Assurance of Nuclear Material Safety”