February 2012

Cooperation In The Baltic Sea Region Must Become An Inspiration To Other Eu Regions, Says Lithuanian Foreign Minister

By casting the role of the first EU macro-region to the Baltic Sea region, the European Commission has acknowledged its potential and possibilities. However, it is also a huge responsibility to prove that such a new method of European regional cooperation is viable, says Lithuanian Minister of Foreign Affairs Audronius Ažubalis.

Politician with Hotchpotch in His Head

By Fazil Ischakov

In political Kunstkamera of Kazakhstan has recently appeared a new character, ex-postman, oil trader and businessman, ex-leader of the party “Rukhaniyat”, green to his bones Serikzhan Mambetalin. Green not because he defended ecology from the tribune of the political union. He preferred green US dollars without hiding it from public that the post of the party leader was bought for investments. This is the way it is called now….

Denmark's European Minister: Responsibility and future growth are keywords for Danish EU Council presidency

By Nicolai Wammen

I hardly exaggerate by saying that more than ever has the cooperation in Europe been put to the test in recent years. This test will continue for the foreseeable future as the debt crisis continues to worry the financial markets about the long-term sustainability of European economies.

What's Georgia Going To Get At The NATO Summit?

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By Joshua Kucera

Georgia's prospects in NATO, after being more or less left for dead in the wake of the 2008 war with Russia, have lately appeared to be improving. NATO has recently changed its rhetoric on Georgia, for the first time calling it an "aspirant" along with several Balkan countries. And U.S. officials have said Georgia is making "significant progress" that should be recognized at the next NATO summit, in Chicago in May.

Why France’s Withdrawal from Afghanistan is Not a Strategy

By Alexandra de Hoop Scheffer

President Barack Obama’s announcement last June of an accelerated U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan reopened debates in many European countries over when their soldiers should return from that unpopular war. French President Nicolas Sarkozy followed a few days later with an announcement that French troops would be reduced “in a proportional manner and in a calendar comparable to the withdrawal of American reinforcements.” Now, the tables have turned. With last week’s announcement, it was France that reset the transition calendar, arguing that progress in the transition allowed for the withdrawal of 1,000 French troops by the end of 2012. Although many U.S., Afghan, and NATO observers were initially critical, the Obama administration announced only a few days later that the United States also planned to end its combat mission in Afghanistan by mid-2013 and shift primarily to advising Afghan forces.