October 2010

Lessons from Prague: How the Czech Republic Has Enhanced Its Energy Security

By Andrej Nosko and Petr Lang

With regard to energy security in the European Union, it has become common knowledge that there are still two Europes.  The security of energy is dividing the continent broadly along what used to be the Iron Curtain. The Western part has both effective and poorly functioning energy markets, but generally a fairly well balanced energy mix.  In contrast, the Eastern part is almost the opposite; the region has accumulated and continues to confront many challenges.

A Look Behind The Scenes Of The ASEM Summit

The 8th ASEM (Asia-Europe meeting) Summit will take place on October 4th and 5th 2010. This summit is held every two years, sometimes in Asia, sometimes in Europe. It is indisputably the most important event organised within the framework of this Presidency. There is an aspect of this meeting that few people will tell you about: its organisation. In practice, what does such a summit involve in terms of preparations?

CSTO: Half Dead, Half Alive

By Roman Muzalevsky

“CORF [Collective Operational Reaction forces] will be no worse than NATO,” claimed Russian President, Dmitry Medvedev, only one year ago. Today, these words are used in Russia to popularize the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and the CORF within the post-Soviet space.

Pipelines and Pipe Dreams

By Matthew Hulbert

Things are looking up for Russia. In late August, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin finally opened a new pipeline exporting East Siberian oil to China. Dubbed the Eastern Siberia-Pacific Ocean pipeline, or ESPO, the plan is to pump 1.6 million barrels per day toward the Pacific Ocean over the next few years. The rationale is clear. Diversifying supplies to Asia offers Russia the Holy Grail that all energy producers want — leverage over competing consumers in the East and West.